Happy Publication day to Cathy Scott-Clark and Adrian Levy

A very happy publication to Cathy Scott-Clark and Adrian Levy, whose fantastic book, The Exile is now out in the world for all to read. 

The book is an extraordinary look at inside story of Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda in the years after 9/11.

Following the attacks on the Twin Towers, Osama bin Laden, the most wanted man in the world, eluded intelligence services and Special Forces units for almost a decade. Using remarkable, first-person testimony from bin Laden's family and his closest aides, The Exile chronicles this astonishing tale of evasion, collusion and isolation.

In intimate detail, The Exile reveals not only the frantic attack on Afghanistan by the United States in their hunt for bin Laden but also how and why, when they found his family soon afterm, the Bush administration rejected the chance to seize themhim. It charts the formation of ISIS, and uncovers the wasted opportunity to kill its Al Qaeda-sponsored founder; it explores the development of the CIA's torture programme; it details Iran's secret shelter for bin Laden's family and Al Qaeda's military council; and it captures the power struggles, paranoia and claustrophobia within the Abbottabad house prior to the raid.

A landmark work of investigation and reportage, The Exile is as authoritative as it is compelling, and essential reading for anyone concerned with history, security and future relations with the Islamic world. 

Get hold of a copy here. 

Hodder & Stoughton to publish Dr Fern Riddell

We're thrilled to share news that Hodder & Stoughton have acquired a biography of little-known suffragette Kitty Marion by historian Fern Riddell. The book will be based upon never before published diaries written by Kitty herself. There are only three copies of this diary in existence – two in the UK and one in New York. Fern chanced upon the diaries in the Museum of London archive and quickly realised they contained a shocking story that has been grievously overlooked and written out of history up until now. A Dangerous Woman will tell the incredible story of Kitty’s life – including the extreme acts she performed in the name of the suffragette cause. The book will be published in June 2018 to coincide with the 200th anniversary of women gaining the right to vote.

Fern Riddell is a cultural historian specialising in sex, suffrage and entertainment in the Victorian and Edwardian eras. She appears regularly on TV and radio, and writes for the Guardian, Huffington Post, and Times Higher Education among others, and is a columnist for BBC History Magazine. In May 2017 she completed her PHD on the life of Kitty Marion.

Editor Maddy Price said: ‘I was so excited when I started to read Fern’s telling of Kitty’s story, because it turns all of our assumptions about the suffragettes upside down. Fern’s passion for her subject and flair for vivid historical writing have fuelled my excitement further, and I am thrilled to be publishing her.’

Fern Riddell said: ‘We are still marching for the things Kitty was fighting for – rights over our bodies, not to be sexually assaulted, and for our voices to be heard. This is why Kitty’s story is so important, and why I’m excited to be sharing her experiences with readers.’

A Dangerous Woman by Fern Riddell will be published in hardback, trade paperback and ebook in June 2018.

Happy Publication Day Sarah Fraser

Sarah Fraser's The Prince Who Would Be King is also out today from HarperCollins. Congratulations Sarah!

Henry Stuart’s life is the last great forgotten Jacobean tale. Shadowed by the gravity of the Thirty Years’ War and the huge changes taking place across Europe in seventeenth-century society, economy, politics and empire, his life was visually and verbally gorgeous.

Henry Stuart, Prince of Wales was once the hope of Britain. Eldest son to James VI of Scotland, James I of England, Henry was the epitome of heroic Renaissance princely virtue, his life set against a period about as rich and momentous as any.

Educated to rule, Henry was interested in everything. His court was awash with leading artists, musicians, writers and composers such as Ben Jonson and Inigo Jones. He founded a royal art collection of European breadth, amassed a vast collection of priceless books, led grand renovations of royal palaces and mounted operatic, highly politicised masques.

But his ambitions were even greater. He embraced cutting-edge science, funded telescopes and automata, was patron of the NorthWest Passage Company and wanted to sail through the barriers of the known world to explore new continents. He reviewed and modernised Britain’s naval and military capacity and in his advocacy for the colonisation of North America he helped to transform the world.

At his death aged only eighteen, and considering himself to be as much a European as British, he was preparing to stake his claim to be the next leader of Protestant Christendom in the struggle to resist a resurgent militant Catholicism.

In this rich and lively book, Sarah Fraser seeks to restore Henry to his place in history. Set against the bloody traumas of the Thirty Years’ War, the writing of the King James Bible, the Gunpowder Plot and the dark tragedies pouring from Shakespeare’s quill, Henry’s life is the last great forgotten Jacobean tale: the story of a man who, had he lived, might have saved Britain from King Charles I, his spaniels and the Civil War with its appalling loss of life his misrule engendered.

Happy Publication day Meena Kandasamy

We're having a wonderfully busy week here at DGA as we wish Meena Kandasamy a very happy publication day too, as her second novel When I Hit You is released into the world today by Atlantic Books. 

It would take Carol Ann Duffy, Caroline Criado-Perez, Arundhati Roy and Salman Rushdie to match Kandasamy's infinite variety - Independent

Revelations come to Kandasamy frequently and prophecies linger at her lips. Older by nearly half a century, I acknowledge the superiority of her poetic vision - Kamala Das

Seduced by politics, poetry and an enduring dream of building a better world together, the unnamed narrator falls in love with a university professor. Moving with him to a rain-washed coastal town, she swiftly learns that what for her is a bond of love is for him a contract of ownership. As he sets about reducing her to his idealised version of an obedient wife, bullying her and devouring her ambition of being a writer in the process, she attempts to push back – a resistance he resolves to break with violence and rape.

At once the chronicle of an abusive marriage and a celebration of the invincible power of art, When I Hit You is a smart, fierce and courageous take on traditional wedlock in modern India.

Happy Publication Day to Jessica J. Lee

Wishing a very happy publication day to Jessica J. Lee, whose debut work of non-fiction, a beautiful swimming memoir, Turning, is out today from Virago. 

She swims to explore the natural history of fresh water and to examine her own place and identity in the world. Turning is a nature memoir chronicling Jessica J. Lee's year of swimming.

'The water slips over me like cool silk. The intimacy of touch uninhibited, rising around my legs, over my waist, my breasts, up to my collarbone. When I throw back my head and relax, the lake runs into my ears. The sound of it is a muffled roar, the vibration of the body amplified by water, every sound felt as if in slow motion . . .' Summer swimming . . . but Jessica Lee - Canadian, Chinese and British - swims through all four seasons and especially loves the winter. 'I long for the ice. The sharp cut of freezing water on my feet. The immeasurable black of the lake at its coldest. Swimming then means cold, and pain, and elation.'

At the age of twenty-eight, Jessica Lee, who grew up in Canada and lived in London, finds herself in Berlin. Alone. Lonely, with lowered spirits thanks to some family history and a broken heart, she is there, ostensibly, to write a thesis. And though that is what she does daily, what increasingly occupies her is swimming. So she makes a decision that she believes will win her back her confidence and independence: she will swim fifty-two of the lakes around Berlin, no matter what the weather or season. She is aware that this particular landscape is not without its own ghosts and history.

This is the story of a beautiful obsession: of the thrill of a still, turquoise lake, of cracking the ice before submerging, of floating under blue skies, of tangled weeds and murkiness, of cool, fresh, spring swimming - of facing past fears of near drowning and of breaking free.

When she completes her year of swimming Jessica finds she has new strength, and she has also found friends and has gained some understanding of how the landscape both haunts and holds us.

This book is for everyone who loves swimming, who wishes they could push themselves beyond caution, who understands the deep pleasure of using their body's strength, who knows what it is to allow oneself to abandon all thought and float home to the surface.

She's celebrating the launch tonight at Daunt Books, Hampstead.  Have a brilliant time and happy swimming!

Frank Trentmann Awarded Humboldt Prize for Research

We're delighted to share the news that the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation has awarded Frank Trentmann their Humboldt Prize for Research (Humboldt-Forschungspreis). The €60,000 prize is awarded “in recognition of a researcher's entire achievements to date to academics whose fundamental discoveries, new theories, or insights have had a significant impact on their own discipline and who are expected to continue producing cutting-edge achievements in the future”. Wonderful news.

Frank Trentmann's Empire of Things: How We Became a World of Consumers, from the Fifteenth Century to the Twenty-First is available to buy now, and is published by Penguin's Allen Lane. His next book, The Germans: A Moral History, 1943 - 2020, is set to publish in Autumn of 2020 by Allen Lane in the UK, Knopf in the USA, Fischer Verlag in Germany, De Arbeiderspers in Holland and Corpus in Russia.

 

 

 

Jennifer Killick - ALEX SPARROW AND THE REALLY BIG STINK

Congratulations to Jennifer Killick, whose first book, Alex Sparrow and the Really Big Stink was launched into the world last night at Waterstones Uxbridge from Firefly Press. It's now available through Waterstones and will be released widely next week. The book has been selected for the Summer Reading Challenge 2017!

Alex Sparrow is a super-agent in training. He is also a human lie-detector. Working with Jess - who can communicate with animals - they must find out why their friends, and enemies, are all changing into polite and well behaved pupils. And exactly who is behind it all. This is a humorous tale full of smells, jokes and superhero references. Oh, and a rather clever goldfish called Bob. In a world where kids' flaws and peculiarities are being erased out of existence, Alex and Jess must rely on what makes them different to save the day.

Get hold of your copy here.

Shashi Tharoor's INGLORIOUS EMPIRE no.6 on Sunday Times Bestseller List

We're delighted to announce that Shashi Tharoor's Inglorious Empire: What The British Did to India is at number 6 on The Sunday Times Bestseller List this week. Congratulations Shashi!

In the eighteenth century, India’s share of the world economy was as large as Europe’s. By 1947, after two centuries of British rule, it had decreased six-fold. Beyond conquest and deception, the Empire blew rebels from cannon, massacred unarmed protesters, entrenched institutionalised racism, and caused millions to die from starvation.

British imperialism justified itself as enlightened despotism for the benefit of the governed, but Shashi Tharoor takes on and demolishes this position, demonstrating how every supposed imperial ‘gift’ – from the railways to the rule of law – was designed in Britain’s interests alone. He goes on to show how Britain’s Industrial Revolution was founded on India’s deindustrialisation, and the destruction of its textile industry.

In this bold and incisive reassessment of colonialism, Tharoor exposes to devastating effect the inglorious reality of Britain’s stained Indian legacy.

Get hold of a copy here. 

Adaptation of Alan Warner's The Soprano's wins Olivier Award

We are utterly delighted to announce that Vicky Featherstone and Lee Hall's Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour, an adaptation of Alan Warner's 1998 novel The Sopranos, has won the Olivier Award for Best New Comedy! 

Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour. produced by Sonia Friedman Productions, Scott M. Delman and Tulchin Bartner Productions is a National Theatre of Scotland and Live Theatre production.

Following seasons at the National Theatre of Great Britain, Edinburgh Festival Fringe and a UK Tour, the smash hit, award-winning new musical Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour has been transferred to London’s West End for a strictly-limited season.

From the creator of Billy Elliot (Lee Hall) comes the uplifting and moving story of six Catholic choir girls from Oban, let loose in Edinburgh for one day only. Funny, heartbreaking and raucously rude, Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour is adapted from Alan Warner’s brilliant novel, and directed by Vicky Featherstone.

Featuring the songs of ELO, Our Ladies is a glorious anthem to friendship, youth and growing up disgracefully.

Prepare thyself for 24 hours of holy chaos. 

Happy Publication Day to M G Leonard!

Wishing an incredibly happy publication day to M G Leonard, whose book, Beetle Queen is released into the world today from Chicken House Books. 

In the second of the Beetle trilogy, cruel beetle fashionista, Lucretia Cutter, is at large with her yellow ladybird spies.

When Darkus, Virginia and Bertolt discover further evidence of her evil, they’re determined to stop her. But the three friends are in trouble. Darkus’ dad has forbidden them to investigate any further – and disgusting crooks Humphrey and Pickering are out of prison. Hope rests on Novak, Lucretia’s daughter and a Hollywood actress, but the beetle diva is always one scuttle ahead …

Beetle Queen is the sequel to the bestselling Beetle Boy, a previous Waterstones' Children's Book of the Month.

Get hold of the book here today! 

Nikki Gemmell appears on The Australian Story

A week ahead of publication, Nikki Gemmell has appeared on The Australia Story, recounting the events of her mother's death. Do catch up online and make sure you put 27th March in your diaries, when After will be available to buy in Australia and New Zealand.

Australia's bravest and most honest writer explores the devastating aftermath of her elderly mother's decision to end her own life.

Nikki Gemmell's world changed forever in October 2015 when the body of her elderly mother was found and it became clear she had decided to end her own life. After the immediate shock and devastation came the guilt and the horror, for Nikki, her family, relatives and friends. No note was left, so the questions that Elayn's death raised were endless. Was the decision an act of independence or the very opposite? Was it a desperate act driven by hopelessness and anger, or was her euthanasia a reasoned act of empowerment?

After is the story of Elayn Gemmell - and the often difficult, prickly relationship between mothers and daughters, and how that changes over time. As anguished as it truthful, as powerful as it is profound, After is about life, death, elderly parents, mothers and daughters, hurt and healing, and about how little, sometimes, we know the ones we love the most.

A deeply intimate, fiercely beautiful, blazingly bold and important book.

Catch up on Nikki's episode of The Australian Story here. 

TV rights for After have been optioned, and French rights sold to Au Diable Vauvert. It is on submission in the UK and US.

Jacob Ross wins Jhalak Prize for Books of the Year by a Writer of Colour

We are thrilled to share that Jacob Ross has won the inaugural Jhalak Prize for Book of the Year by a Writer of Colour for his crime novel The Bone Readers (Peepal Tree).

Ross, a poet, novelist, short story writer and tutor who was born in Grenada but has lived in the UK for over 30 years, won the £1,000 prize for a novel described by the judges as "by turns thrilling, visceral and meditative, and always cinematic". The Bone Readers is the first in the Camaho Quartet and set on the small Caribbean island of Camaho.

Founded by authors Sunny Singh and Nikesh Shukla in conjunction with Media Diversified, the award exists to celebrate the achievements of British writers of colour.

The judging panel, consisting of Singh, YA author Catherine Johnson, author and poet Alex Wheatle MBE, poet and broadcaster Musa Okwonga and Man Booker prize-longlisted fiction writer Yvvette Edwards, chose Ross’ book in a "close contest and after much heated discussion".

Singh said: “The final decision was very difficult and very close. The entire shortlist is so extraordinary that any and all of them are deserving winners. For me Jacob Ross's The Bone Readers stood out not only as an exemplar of the genre but for rising well above it. The book engages - and with a masterly, feather light touch - with history as well as contemporary politics of the Caribbean. Complex issues of memory, identity and, individual and collective sense of self, are stunningly woven into this beautifully written novel. As the first of the Camaho Quartet, it hints at the expanse and scale of the forthcoming books. But it also stands alone as a breath-taking, thoughtprovoking, and yes brilliant read. I know this is a book I shall go back to again and again.”

Johnson added: “Ross's novel is one that effortlessly draws together the past and the present, gender, politics and the legacy of colonialism in a top quality Caribbean set crime thriller. The Bone Readers is a wonderful read and a massively worthy winner."

Ross' novel beat off competition from The Girl Of Ink And Stars by Kiran Millwood Hargrave (Chicken House), A Rising Man by Abir Mukherjee (Harvill Secker), Speak Gigantular by Irenosen Okojie (Jacaranda), Black And British: A Forgotten History by David Olusoga (Macmillan), and Another Day In The Death Of America by Gary Younge (Faber).

The winner was announced at a special event at The Authors’ Club on Friday (17th March 2017).

Comedian Shappi Khorsandi withdrew from the longlist in January saying she wanted her writing to be "inclusive" to all her readers.

The Boys of Everest by Clint Willis

Make sure you get your hands on a copy of The Boys of Everest, freshly released from Mountaineers Books. 

The Boys of Everest by Clint Willis tells the gripping story of “Bonington’s Boys,” a band of climbers who reinvented mountaineering during the three decades after Everest’s first ascent. It is a story of tremendous courage, astonishing achievement, and heartbreaking loss. Chris Bonington’s inner circle included a dozen of mountaineering’s most legendary figures—Don Whillans, John Harlin, Dougal Haston, Doug Scott, Peter Boardman, Joe Tasker, and others—who together gave birth to a new brand of climbing. They took increasingly challenging risks on now-legendary expeditions to the world’s most fearsome peaks—and they paid an enormous price. Most of them died in the mountains, leaving behind the hardest question of all: was it worth it?

“Willis's classy style turns reportage into literature . . . Bonington's Boys come across as raw, anguished souls . . . As Willis describes in his artful prose, their suffering is not just a means to an end (the summit), it is an end.” –The New York Times

“A gripping adventure saga . . .”–Publishers Weekly

“A death-haunted saga of the scalers of heaven . . .” –Kirkus Reviews

“Mr. Willis tells a story that is gripping and poignant and even appalling . . .” –The Wall Street Journal

Get hold of a copy here.

Happy Publication Day to Alison MacLeod!

We're delighted to be wishing Alison MacLeod a very happy book birthday. Her short story collection, All The Beloved Ghosts is out today.

The acutely observed, evocative collection from the Man Booker Prize-longlisted author of Unexploded, blends fiction, biography and memoir.

Hovering on the border of life and death, these stories form a ground-shifting collection, taking us into history, literature and the hidden lives of iconic figures. 

In 1920s Nova Scotia, as winter begins to thaw, a woman emerges from mourning and wears a new fur coat to a dance that will change everything. A teenager searches for his lover on a charged summer evening in 2011, as around him London erupts in anger. A cardiac specialist lingers on the edge of consciousness as he awaits a new heart – and is transported to an attic room half a century ago. In an ancient Yorkshire churchyard, the author visits Sylvia Plath's grave and makes an unexpected connection across time. On a trip to Brighton, reluctant jihadists face the ultimate spiritual test. And at Charleston, Angelica Garnett, child of the Bloomsbury Group, is overcome by the past, all the beloved ghosts that spring to life before her eyes. 

Precise, playful and evocative, these exquisitely crafted stories explore memory, the media and mortality, unfolding at the line between reality and fiction. Written with vigorous intelligence and delicate insight, this collection captures the surprising joys, small tragedies and profound truths of existence. 

Kirkus Reviews says of the stories - "[they] are written in striking prose that seamlessly blends the real with the fictive, tapping into the unknown with compassion and genuine human emotion.

A uniquely cohesive collection of short examinations of aging, death, and living, these stories are subtly moving and thoroughly engaging."

Get hold of a copy here!

Happy Publication Day Samantha Shannon!

All at DGA are wishing Samantha Shannon a very happy publication day as The Song Rising, the third installment in The Bone Season series is released today from Bloomsbury!

Following a bloody battle against foes on every side, Paige Mahoney has risen to the dangerous position of Underqueen, ruling over London's criminal population.

But, having turned her back on Jaxon Hall and with vengeful enemies still at large, the task of stabilising the fractured underworld has never seemed so challenging.

Little does Paige know that her reign may be cut short by the introduction of Senshield, a deadly technology that spells doom for the clairvoyant community and the world as they know it.

Grab a copy here!

Praise for The Mime Order

"A riveting page-turner … She creates a convincing world defined by its own invented logic” –  Mail on Sunday

“It goes hell-for-leather, all poltergeists and grisly murders and pitched battles in the catacombs of Camden” –  Sunday Times

“Language as rich as a figgy pudding, the best terminology in the genre and gripping, edge-of-the-seat plotting to boot” –  Daily Mail

“Thrusting readers back into the world of Paige and a more detailed journey through future London. The novels are hugely imaginative ... Part Hunger Games dystopia, part urban fantasy” –  Independent on Sunday

“A triumphant blend of Orwellian dystopia and China Miéville nonconformity ... Shannon's ability to take classic tropes, such as forbidden love and dystopian societies, and give them a well-knuckled twist is to be admired ... Set to become a trailblazer for young talent” –  Independent

The Mime Order is the second book, and is, if anything, more accomplished and imaginative than The Bone Season. I am clearly not the target audience, but, crikey, I'll be second in the queue for Book III ...With a satisfyingly “a-ha” denouement, and some of the best fight scenes I've read in donkey's years, I'm left wondering where Paige and Shannon will go next ... Wherever she does go, I will follow” –  Scotland on Sunday

“Shannon has continued to build on this imagined world with intricacy, and Paige's voice comes through to deliver a suspenseful story” –  Washington Post

 

Shashi Tharoor - INGLORIOUS EMPIRE

Shashi Tharoor's INGLORIOUS EMPIRE: WHAT THE BRITISH DID TO INDIA is swiftly climbing the Amazon Top 100 one week after publication.

In this bold and incisive reassessment of colonialism, Tharoor exposes to devastating effect the inglorious reality of Britain's stained Indian legacy. In the eighteenth century, India's share of the world economy was as large as Europe's. By 1947, after two centuries of British rule, it had decreased six-fold. Beyond conquest and deception, the Empire blew rebels from cannon, massacred unarmed protesters, entrenched institutionalised racism, and caused millions to die from starvation. British imperialism justified itself as enlightened despotism for the benefit of the governed, but Shashi Tharoor takes on and demolishes this position, demonstrating how every supposed imperial 'gift' from the railways to the rule of law was designed in Britain's interests alone. He goes on to show how Britain's Industrial Revolution was founded on India's deindustrialisation, and the destruction of its textile industry.

Watch below to see a clip of Shashi Tharoor on the Channel 4 News.

INGLORIOUS EMPIRE is published by Hurst Publications. Get hold of a copy here. 

Simon Armitage releases new poetry collection, THE UNACCOMPANIED

We'd like to wish a very happy publication day to Simon Armitage, whose eleventh collection of poetry is released today. 

The collection of poems heralds a return to his trademark contemporary lyricism. The pieces in this multi-textured and moving volume are set against a backdrop of economic recession and social division, where mass media, the mass market and globalisation have made alienation a commonplace experience and where the solitary imagination drifts and conjures.

The Unaccompanied documents a world on the brink, a world of unreliable seasons and unstable coordinates, where Odysseus stalks the aisles of cut-price supermarkets in search of direction, where the star of Bethlehem rises over industrial Yorkshire, and where alarm bells for ailing communities go unheeded or unheard. Looking for certainty the mind gravitates to recollections of upbringing and family, only to encounter more unrecoverable worlds, shaped as ever through Armitage's gifts for clarity and detail as well as his characteristic dead-pan wit. Insightful, relevant and empathetic, these poems confirm The Unaccompanied as a bold new statement of intent by one of our most respected and recognised living poets.

'A writer who has had a game-changing influence on his contemporaries.' Guardian

'Armitage is that rare beast: a poet whose work is ambitious, accomplished and complex as well as popular.' Sunday Telegraph

'The best poet of his generation.' Craig Raine, Observer

SURVIVORS wins Blue Peter 'Best Book with Facts' Award

Congratulations go to Kerry Hyndman as Survivors, illustrated by Kerry herself and written by David Long wins the Blue Peter Book Award for 'Best Book with Facts'!

This year's judging panel, who selected the shortlist, was made up of children's author/illustrator and BookTrust's Writer in Residence Sarah McIntyre, radio presenter Nihal Arthanayake and Waterstone's Children's Book Buyer Florentyna Martin.

The winning titles were chosen by over 400 children from 12 schools across the UK who read the shortlisted books and voted for their favourite in each category.

Authors will receive their awards on the Blue Peter Book Awards World Book Day special on 2 March on CBBC.

Do you have what it takes to be a survivor?

The truth, they say, is stranger than fiction and these incredible real-life stories of extreme survival defy belief.

Amongst the incredible tales of daring, courage, cunning and resilience are: The Man Who Sucked Blood from a Shark - a sailor who survived for 133 days on a raft in the Atlantic when his ship was torpedoed, using shark's blood in place of fresh water, The Woman Who Froze to Death, Yet Lived - a woman who was trapped under freezing water for so long her heart stopped only to be revived four hours later by paramedics.

Combining classic tales such as Ernest Shackleton's Antarctic voyage, as well as more modern exploits such as the adventurer who inspired the movie 127 Hours, these astonishing stories will be retold by young readers to all of their friends.

Beautifully presented in a large, hardback format, and fully illustrated in colour throughout, this wonderful anthology is a nail-biting, death-defying treat for all the family.

Get hold of a copy here.

Simon Armitage wins PEN Award for Poetry in Translation

Our heartiest congratulations go to Simon Armitage who has won the PEN Award for Poetry in Translation for his book, Pearl

Simon's version of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight garnered front-page reviews across two continents and confirmed his reputation as a leading translator. This new work is an entrancing allegorical tale of grief and lost love, as the narrator is led on a Dantean journey through sorrow to redemption by his vanished beloved, Pearl. Retaining all the alliterative music of the original, a Medieval English poem thought to be by the same anonymous author responsible for Gawain, Pearl is here brought to vivid and intricate life in care of one of the finest poets writing today.

Praise for Sir Gawain and the Green Knight:

‘Takes you back closer to something of the thrill and the wonder the poem would have had in the days when it was composed. It might even be the best translation of any poem I’ve ever seen … [Armitage] was put on the planet to translate this poem.’ Guardian

‘[Armitage] captures his dialect and his landscape and takes great pains to render the tale’s alliterative texture and drive … He has given us an energetic, free-flowing, high-spirited version.’ New Yorker