Shashi Tharoor's INGLORIOUS EMPIRE no.6 on Sunday Times Bestseller List

We're delighted to announce that Shashi Tharoor's Inglorious Empire: What The British Did to India is at number 6 on The Sunday Times Bestseller List this week. Congratulations Shashi!

In the eighteenth century, India’s share of the world economy was as large as Europe’s. By 1947, after two centuries of British rule, it had decreased six-fold. Beyond conquest and deception, the Empire blew rebels from cannon, massacred unarmed protesters, entrenched institutionalised racism, and caused millions to die from starvation.

British imperialism justified itself as enlightened despotism for the benefit of the governed, but Shashi Tharoor takes on and demolishes this position, demonstrating how every supposed imperial ‘gift’ – from the railways to the rule of law – was designed in Britain’s interests alone. He goes on to show how Britain’s Industrial Revolution was founded on India’s deindustrialisation, and the destruction of its textile industry.

In this bold and incisive reassessment of colonialism, Tharoor exposes to devastating effect the inglorious reality of Britain’s stained Indian legacy.

Get hold of a copy here. 

Adaptation of Alan Warner's The Soprano's wins Olivier Award

We are utterly delighted to announce that Vicky Featherstone and Lee Hall's Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour, an adaptation of Alan Warner's 1998 novel The Sopranos, has won the Olivier Award for Best New Comedy! 

Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour. produced by Sonia Friedman Productions, Scott M. Delman and Tulchin Bartner Productions is a National Theatre of Scotland and Live Theatre production.

Following seasons at the National Theatre of Great Britain, Edinburgh Festival Fringe and a UK Tour, the smash hit, award-winning new musical Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour has been transferred to London’s West End for a strictly-limited season.

From the creator of Billy Elliot (Lee Hall) comes the uplifting and moving story of six Catholic choir girls from Oban, let loose in Edinburgh for one day only. Funny, heartbreaking and raucously rude, Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour is adapted from Alan Warner’s brilliant novel, and directed by Vicky Featherstone.

Featuring the songs of ELO, Our Ladies is a glorious anthem to friendship, youth and growing up disgracefully.

Prepare thyself for 24 hours of holy chaos. 

Happy Publication Day to M G Leonard!

Wishing an incredibly happy publication day to M G Leonard, whose book, Beetle Queen is released into the world today from Chicken House Books. 

In the second of the Beetle trilogy, cruel beetle fashionista, Lucretia Cutter, is at large with her yellow ladybird spies.

When Darkus, Virginia and Bertolt discover further evidence of her evil, they’re determined to stop her. But the three friends are in trouble. Darkus’ dad has forbidden them to investigate any further – and disgusting crooks Humphrey and Pickering are out of prison. Hope rests on Novak, Lucretia’s daughter and a Hollywood actress, but the beetle diva is always one scuttle ahead …

Beetle Queen is the sequel to the bestselling Beetle Boy, a previous Waterstones' Children's Book of the Month.

Get hold of the book here today! 

Nikki Gemmell appears on The Australian Story

A week ahead of publication, Nikki Gemmell has appeared on The Australia Story, recounting the events of her mother's death. Do catch up online and make sure you put 27th March in your diaries, when After will be available to buy in Australia and New Zealand.

Australia's bravest and most honest writer explores the devastating aftermath of her elderly mother's decision to end her own life.

Nikki Gemmell's world changed forever in October 2015 when the body of her elderly mother was found and it became clear she had decided to end her own life. After the immediate shock and devastation came the guilt and the horror, for Nikki, her family, relatives and friends. No note was left, so the questions that Elayn's death raised were endless. Was the decision an act of independence or the very opposite? Was it a desperate act driven by hopelessness and anger, or was her euthanasia a reasoned act of empowerment?

After is the story of Elayn Gemmell - and the often difficult, prickly relationship between mothers and daughters, and how that changes over time. As anguished as it truthful, as powerful as it is profound, After is about life, death, elderly parents, mothers and daughters, hurt and healing, and about how little, sometimes, we know the ones we love the most.

A deeply intimate, fiercely beautiful, blazingly bold and important book.

Catch up on Nikki's episode of The Australian Story here. 

TV rights for After have been optioned, and French rights sold to Au Diable Vauvert. It is on submission in the UK and US.

Jacob Ross wins Jhalak Prize for Books of the Year by a Writer of Colour

We are thrilled to share that Jacob Ross has won the inaugural Jhalak Prize for Book of the Year by a Writer of Colour for his crime novel The Bone Readers (Peepal Tree).

Ross, a poet, novelist, short story writer and tutor who was born in Grenada but has lived in the UK for over 30 years, won the £1,000 prize for a novel described by the judges as "by turns thrilling, visceral and meditative, and always cinematic". The Bone Readers is the first in the Camaho Quartet and set on the small Caribbean island of Camaho.

Founded by authors Sunny Singh and Nikesh Shukla in conjunction with Media Diversified, the award exists to celebrate the achievements of British writers of colour.

The judging panel, consisting of Singh, YA author Catherine Johnson, author and poet Alex Wheatle MBE, poet and broadcaster Musa Okwonga and Man Booker prize-longlisted fiction writer Yvvette Edwards, chose Ross’ book in a "close contest and after much heated discussion".

Singh said: “The final decision was very difficult and very close. The entire shortlist is so extraordinary that any and all of them are deserving winners. For me Jacob Ross's The Bone Readers stood out not only as an exemplar of the genre but for rising well above it. The book engages - and with a masterly, feather light touch - with history as well as contemporary politics of the Caribbean. Complex issues of memory, identity and, individual and collective sense of self, are stunningly woven into this beautifully written novel. As the first of the Camaho Quartet, it hints at the expanse and scale of the forthcoming books. But it also stands alone as a breath-taking, thoughtprovoking, and yes brilliant read. I know this is a book I shall go back to again and again.”

Johnson added: “Ross's novel is one that effortlessly draws together the past and the present, gender, politics and the legacy of colonialism in a top quality Caribbean set crime thriller. The Bone Readers is a wonderful read and a massively worthy winner."

Ross' novel beat off competition from The Girl Of Ink And Stars by Kiran Millwood Hargrave (Chicken House), A Rising Man by Abir Mukherjee (Harvill Secker), Speak Gigantular by Irenosen Okojie (Jacaranda), Black And British: A Forgotten History by David Olusoga (Macmillan), and Another Day In The Death Of America by Gary Younge (Faber).

The winner was announced at a special event at The Authors’ Club on Friday (17th March 2017).

Comedian Shappi Khorsandi withdrew from the longlist in January saying she wanted her writing to be "inclusive" to all her readers.

The Boys of Everest by Clint Willis

Make sure you get your hands on a copy of The Boys of Everest, freshly released from Mountaineers Books. 

The Boys of Everest by Clint Willis tells the gripping story of “Bonington’s Boys,” a band of climbers who reinvented mountaineering during the three decades after Everest’s first ascent. It is a story of tremendous courage, astonishing achievement, and heartbreaking loss. Chris Bonington’s inner circle included a dozen of mountaineering’s most legendary figures—Don Whillans, John Harlin, Dougal Haston, Doug Scott, Peter Boardman, Joe Tasker, and others—who together gave birth to a new brand of climbing. They took increasingly challenging risks on now-legendary expeditions to the world’s most fearsome peaks—and they paid an enormous price. Most of them died in the mountains, leaving behind the hardest question of all: was it worth it?

“Willis's classy style turns reportage into literature . . . Bonington's Boys come across as raw, anguished souls . . . As Willis describes in his artful prose, their suffering is not just a means to an end (the summit), it is an end.” –The New York Times

“A gripping adventure saga . . .”–Publishers Weekly

“A death-haunted saga of the scalers of heaven . . .” –Kirkus Reviews

“Mr. Willis tells a story that is gripping and poignant and even appalling . . .” –The Wall Street Journal

Get hold of a copy here.

Happy Publication Day to Alison MacLeod!

We're delighted to be wishing Alison MacLeod a very happy book birthday. Her short story collection, All The Beloved Ghosts is out today.

The acutely observed, evocative collection from the Man Booker Prize-longlisted author of Unexploded, blends fiction, biography and memoir.

Hovering on the border of life and death, these stories form a ground-shifting collection, taking us into history, literature and the hidden lives of iconic figures. 

In 1920s Nova Scotia, as winter begins to thaw, a woman emerges from mourning and wears a new fur coat to a dance that will change everything. A teenager searches for his lover on a charged summer evening in 2011, as around him London erupts in anger. A cardiac specialist lingers on the edge of consciousness as he awaits a new heart – and is transported to an attic room half a century ago. In an ancient Yorkshire churchyard, the author visits Sylvia Plath's grave and makes an unexpected connection across time. On a trip to Brighton, reluctant jihadists face the ultimate spiritual test. And at Charleston, Angelica Garnett, child of the Bloomsbury Group, is overcome by the past, all the beloved ghosts that spring to life before her eyes. 

Precise, playful and evocative, these exquisitely crafted stories explore memory, the media and mortality, unfolding at the line between reality and fiction. Written with vigorous intelligence and delicate insight, this collection captures the surprising joys, small tragedies and profound truths of existence. 

Kirkus Reviews says of the stories - "[they] are written in striking prose that seamlessly blends the real with the fictive, tapping into the unknown with compassion and genuine human emotion.

A uniquely cohesive collection of short examinations of aging, death, and living, these stories are subtly moving and thoroughly engaging."

Get hold of a copy here!

Happy Publication Day Samantha Shannon!

All at DGA are wishing Samantha Shannon a very happy publication day as The Song Rising, the third installment in The Bone Season series is released today from Bloomsbury!

Following a bloody battle against foes on every side, Paige Mahoney has risen to the dangerous position of Underqueen, ruling over London's criminal population.

But, having turned her back on Jaxon Hall and with vengeful enemies still at large, the task of stabilising the fractured underworld has never seemed so challenging.

Little does Paige know that her reign may be cut short by the introduction of Senshield, a deadly technology that spells doom for the clairvoyant community and the world as they know it.

Grab a copy here!

Praise for The Mime Order

"A riveting page-turner … She creates a convincing world defined by its own invented logic” –  Mail on Sunday

“It goes hell-for-leather, all poltergeists and grisly murders and pitched battles in the catacombs of Camden” –  Sunday Times

“Language as rich as a figgy pudding, the best terminology in the genre and gripping, edge-of-the-seat plotting to boot” –  Daily Mail

“Thrusting readers back into the world of Paige and a more detailed journey through future London. The novels are hugely imaginative ... Part Hunger Games dystopia, part urban fantasy” –  Independent on Sunday

“A triumphant blend of Orwellian dystopia and China Miéville nonconformity ... Shannon's ability to take classic tropes, such as forbidden love and dystopian societies, and give them a well-knuckled twist is to be admired ... Set to become a trailblazer for young talent” –  Independent

The Mime Order is the second book, and is, if anything, more accomplished and imaginative than The Bone Season. I am clearly not the target audience, but, crikey, I'll be second in the queue for Book III ...With a satisfyingly “a-ha” denouement, and some of the best fight scenes I've read in donkey's years, I'm left wondering where Paige and Shannon will go next ... Wherever she does go, I will follow” –  Scotland on Sunday

“Shannon has continued to build on this imagined world with intricacy, and Paige's voice comes through to deliver a suspenseful story” –  Washington Post

 

Shashi Tharoor - INGLORIOUS EMPIRE

Shashi Tharoor's INGLORIOUS EMPIRE: WHAT THE BRITISH DID TO INDIA is swiftly climbing the Amazon Top 100 one week after publication.

In this bold and incisive reassessment of colonialism, Tharoor exposes to devastating effect the inglorious reality of Britain's stained Indian legacy. In the eighteenth century, India's share of the world economy was as large as Europe's. By 1947, after two centuries of British rule, it had decreased six-fold. Beyond conquest and deception, the Empire blew rebels from cannon, massacred unarmed protesters, entrenched institutionalised racism, and caused millions to die from starvation. British imperialism justified itself as enlightened despotism for the benefit of the governed, but Shashi Tharoor takes on and demolishes this position, demonstrating how every supposed imperial 'gift' from the railways to the rule of law was designed in Britain's interests alone. He goes on to show how Britain's Industrial Revolution was founded on India's deindustrialisation, and the destruction of its textile industry.

Watch below to see a clip of Shashi Tharoor on the Channel 4 News.

INGLORIOUS EMPIRE is published by Hurst Publications. Get hold of a copy here. 

Simon Armitage releases new poetry collection, THE UNACCOMPANIED

We'd like to wish a very happy publication day to Simon Armitage, whose eleventh collection of poetry is released today. 

The collection of poems heralds a return to his trademark contemporary lyricism. The pieces in this multi-textured and moving volume are set against a backdrop of economic recession and social division, where mass media, the mass market and globalisation have made alienation a commonplace experience and where the solitary imagination drifts and conjures.

The Unaccompanied documents a world on the brink, a world of unreliable seasons and unstable coordinates, where Odysseus stalks the aisles of cut-price supermarkets in search of direction, where the star of Bethlehem rises over industrial Yorkshire, and where alarm bells for ailing communities go unheeded or unheard. Looking for certainty the mind gravitates to recollections of upbringing and family, only to encounter more unrecoverable worlds, shaped as ever through Armitage's gifts for clarity and detail as well as his characteristic dead-pan wit. Insightful, relevant and empathetic, these poems confirm The Unaccompanied as a bold new statement of intent by one of our most respected and recognised living poets.

'A writer who has had a game-changing influence on his contemporaries.' Guardian

'Armitage is that rare beast: a poet whose work is ambitious, accomplished and complex as well as popular.' Sunday Telegraph

'The best poet of his generation.' Craig Raine, Observer

SURVIVORS wins Blue Peter 'Best Book with Facts' Award

Congratulations go to Kerry Hyndman as Survivors, illustrated by Kerry herself and written by David Long wins the Blue Peter Book Award for 'Best Book with Facts'!

This year's judging panel, who selected the shortlist, was made up of children's author/illustrator and BookTrust's Writer in Residence Sarah McIntyre, radio presenter Nihal Arthanayake and Waterstone's Children's Book Buyer Florentyna Martin.

The winning titles were chosen by over 400 children from 12 schools across the UK who read the shortlisted books and voted for their favourite in each category.

Authors will receive their awards on the Blue Peter Book Awards World Book Day special on 2 March on CBBC.

Do you have what it takes to be a survivor?

The truth, they say, is stranger than fiction and these incredible real-life stories of extreme survival defy belief.

Amongst the incredible tales of daring, courage, cunning and resilience are: The Man Who Sucked Blood from a Shark - a sailor who survived for 133 days on a raft in the Atlantic when his ship was torpedoed, using shark's blood in place of fresh water, The Woman Who Froze to Death, Yet Lived - a woman who was trapped under freezing water for so long her heart stopped only to be revived four hours later by paramedics.

Combining classic tales such as Ernest Shackleton's Antarctic voyage, as well as more modern exploits such as the adventurer who inspired the movie 127 Hours, these astonishing stories will be retold by young readers to all of their friends.

Beautifully presented in a large, hardback format, and fully illustrated in colour throughout, this wonderful anthology is a nail-biting, death-defying treat for all the family.

Get hold of a copy here.

Simon Armitage wins PEN Award for Poetry in Translation

Our heartiest congratulations go to Simon Armitage who has won the PEN Award for Poetry in Translation for his book, Pearl

Simon's version of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight garnered front-page reviews across two continents and confirmed his reputation as a leading translator. This new work is an entrancing allegorical tale of grief and lost love, as the narrator is led on a Dantean journey through sorrow to redemption by his vanished beloved, Pearl. Retaining all the alliterative music of the original, a Medieval English poem thought to be by the same anonymous author responsible for Gawain, Pearl is here brought to vivid and intricate life in care of one of the finest poets writing today.

Praise for Sir Gawain and the Green Knight:

‘Takes you back closer to something of the thrill and the wonder the poem would have had in the days when it was composed. It might even be the best translation of any poem I’ve ever seen … [Armitage] was put on the planet to translate this poem.’ Guardian

‘[Armitage] captures his dialect and his landscape and takes great pains to render the tale’s alliterative texture and drive … He has given us an energetic, free-flowing, high-spirited version.’ New Yorker

 

Bad Show On Stage

BAD SHOW by Bob Woffinden and James Plaskett (Bojangles Books) has been turned into a stage play.

The book looks into what really happened on that fateful night when Major Charles Ingram reached the million-pound prize on the television programme Who Wants To be A Millionaire?, the victimisation of Charles and his wife Diana by the British media and their subsequent ordeal within the criminal justice system.

DGA negotiated the sale of stage rights soon after the book's original publication in January 2015.

The stage play will be directed by Daniel Evans and has been written by the award-winning playwright James Graham, whose play This House is currently enjoying a very successful run at the Garrick Theatre in the West End.

Bad Show has been retitled Quiz for the stage. It will be have its premiere later this year at the Minerva Theatre in Chichester. Visit the Chichester Festival Theatre website for tickets and more information.

Happy Publication Day to Charlotte Salter

Dial Books, part of Penguin Random House US, publish Charlotte Salter's THE BONE SNATCHER today! Happy book birthday, Charlotte.

Murder, madness, and sea monsters combine in this thrilling and atmospheric middle grade debut perfect for fans of Neil Gaiman, Lemony Snicket, and Tim Burton.

Sophie Seacove is a storyteller. She tells stories of what the world would be like if madness hadn’t taken over. If her parents hadn’t sold her off as a servant to pay for their passage out of London. If she wasn’t now trapped in a decaying mansion filled with creepy people and surrounded by ravenous sea monsters.

The mansion has plenty of stories, too: About fantastical machines, and the tragic inventor who created them. About his highly suspicious death.  And about the Monster Box, a mysterious object hidden in the house that just might hold the key to escaping this horrible place—and to reuniting Sophie with her family.

But not everyone wants Sophie to have the Monster Box, and as she gets closer to finding it, she finds herself unspooling years-old secrets—and dodging dangerous attacks. Sophie needs to use her brains, her brawn, and her unbreakable nature if she wants to make it off this wretched island…and live to tell this story.

Buy the book here

Hannah Kohler on 2017 International Dylan Thomas Prize Longlist

The good news just keeps coming! Hannah Kohler's debut novel is among the 12 literary works to reach the longlist for the 2017 International Dylan Thomas Prize. The prize is awarded for the best published literary work in the English language, written by an author aged 39 or under. The prize is named after the Swansea-born writer, Dylan Thomas, and celebrates his 39 years of creativity and productivity. One of the most influential, internationally-renowned writers of the mid-twentieth century, the prize invokes his memory to support the writers of today and nurture the talents of tomorrow. 

Jeannie is nineteen when the world changes, Kip only fourteen. The sudden accident that robs them of their mother leaves them adrift, with only their father to guide them. Jeannie seeks escape in work and later marriage to a man whose social connections propel her into an unfamiliar world of wealth and politics. Ill-equipped and unprepared, Jeannie finds comfort where she can. Meanwhile Kip's descent into a life of petty crime is halted only when he volunteers for the Marines.


By 1968, the conflict in Vietnam is at its height, and with the anti-war movement raging at home, Jeannie and Kip are swept along by events larger than themselves, driven by disillusionment to commit unforgiveable acts of betrayal that will leave permanent scars.

The Outside Lands is the story of people caught in the slipstream of history, how we struggle in the face of loss to build our world, and how easily and with sudden violence it can be swept away. With extraordinary skill and accuracy, Hannah Kohler takes us from 1960s California to Vietnam, capturing what it means to live through historic times. This powerful debut novel announces Kohler as a remarkable new literary talent.

This years' long list comprises of: six novels, four short story collections, and two volumes of poetry. Good luck Hannah!

Anuk Arudpragasm - The Story of a Brief Marriage (Granta)

Alys Conran - Pigeon (Parthian)

Jonathan Safran Foer - Here I Am (Farrar, Straus & Giroux)

Yaa Gyasi - Homegoing (Alfred A Knopf)

Benjamin Hale - The Fat Artist and Other Stories (Picador)

Luke Kennard - Cain (Penned in the Margins)

Hannah Kohler - The Outside Lands (Picador)

Fiona McFarlane - The High Places (Farrar, Straus & Giroux)

Helen Oyeyemi - What is Not Yours is Not Yours (Picador)

Sarah Perry - The Essex Serpent (Serpent’s Tail)

Safiya Sinclair - Cannibal (University of Nebraska Press)

Callan Wink - Dog Run Moon: Stories (Granta)

Nilanjana Roy & M. G. Leonard reach Waterstones Children's Book Prize Shortlist

We are absolutely delighted to share that not one but two DGA authors have made it on to the Waterstones Children's Book Prize Shortlist 2017. Nilanjana Roy has been nominated in the Older Readers category for her book, The Wildings and M. G. Leonard's Beetle Boy is in the Younger Readers category. 

Waterstones said "For our Children’s Buyer Florentyna Martin, “whilst reading has always encouraged an element of escapism, this year’s shortlists provide a guiding light of optimism in the face of uncertain times... we’re delighted to celebrate these inspiring books.

The bookseller voting now begins, leading to our category winner evening to be held at our Waterstones Piccadilly flagship, Europe’s largest bookshop, on Thursday 30th March 2017. Of the three category winners – who will each receive £2000 - just one will be crowned our overall Waterstones Book Prize winner for the year, a Prize worth £3000 and the weight of our national support."

Beetle Boy - M. G. Leonard

Nominated for the CILIP Carnegie Medal 2017

Longlisted for the UKLA award 2017.

Dr Bartholomew Cuttle wasn’t the kind of man who mysteriously disappeared. He was the kind of man who read enormous old books at the dinner table and got fried egg stuck in his beard.

Darkus Cuttle’s dad is missing, vanished from a locked room and now everything for Darkus is about to change.

Miserable and lonely, he is forced to move in with his eccentric uncle Max, next door to the most disgusting neighbours ever and their house infested by beetles.

But when a giant beetle called Baxter comes to his rescue, Darkus learns that these are no ordinary creatures. They’re an incredible super-species and they could just be the key to solving the mystery of his dad’s disappearance.

When links begin to emerge connecting the crime with cruel Lucretia Cutter, mad scientist and  fashionista, and her penchant for beetle jewellery, Darkus, Dexter and the other beetles are caught in a race against time to find the answers.

A coffee-mug mountain, home to a million insects, could provide the answer - if Darkus and Baxter are brave enough to find it.

The Wildings - Nilanjana Roy

Beraal was the most fierce of the queens of Nizamuddin, and could take on many of the toms. She was a fine hunter – swift, silent and precise – and her immediate concern was finding the stranger who threatened their peace.
 

Something is stirring in the heart of Old Delhi...

Prowling, hunting and fighting amidst the crumbling ruins of one of Delhi's oldest neighbourhoods, are the proud Wildings. These feral cats fear no one, go where they want and do as they please. Battle-scarred tomcats, fierce warrior queens, the Wildings have ruled over Nizamuddin for centuries.

Now there is a new addition to the clan - a pampered housecat with strange powers that could turn their world on its head. And something is stirring in the old Shuttered House - something dark and cruel and dangerous.

As a terrifying new enemy emerges from the shadows, the Wildings will need all the allies they can get, as they fight for Nizamuddin, and their lives.

An clear successor to some of Waterstones’ best-loved writers, including Richard Adams and Brian Jacques, India Nilanjana Roy has created an anthropomorphic adventure that is full of rich symbolism and vivid imagination, a new world for readers to lose themselves inside.

Happy Publication Day to Clover Stroud

Wishing a very happy publication day to Clover Stroud, whose memoir, The Wild Other is released into the world today, published by Hodder.

Clover's idyllic childhood in rural England was shattered when a horrific riding accident left her mother permanently brain-damaged.

Just sixteen, she embarked on a journey to find the sense of home that had been so savagely broken. Travelling from gypsy camps in Ireland, to the rodeos of west Texas and then to Russia's war-torn Caucasus, Clover eventually found her way back to England's lyrical Vale of the White Horse.

The Wild Other is a grippingly honest account of love, loss, family and the healing strength of nature. Powerful and deeply emotional, this is the story of an extraordinary life lived at its fullest.

Early reviews

There is so much richly evoked life here... beautifully written. Cathy Rentzenbrink The Times

Clover Stroud is a born writer: honest, tender, moving and true. A beautiful book. Cressida Connolly

Horses, family ties, exotic lovers and beautiful writing all saddle up in this thoroughbred ride through love, loss, danger, motherhood and healing. The Bookseller

A stunning story of courage in the face of fortune's cruellest blows, Clover Stroud's extraordinary memoir charts her journey from child to adult, from daughter to mother, proving that bravery - and love - will triumph even in the darkest situations. Rosie Boycott

Beautifully written and so moving ... a gritty, passionate, searingly honest meditation on grief, love and motherhood. Katie Hickman

Beautifully written...I love this book. India Knight

Heart-wrenching and beautifully written. Polly Samson

An astonishing piece of work that at times made my heart burst. All of human life is contained in this book. Clover Stroud is a remarkable woman, and an incredible writer. Bryony Gordon

Fearless, frank and so beautifully told, The Wild Other is a defiant story of love and motherhood in the face of loss. One of those books that makes you resolve to wring every last exhilarating drop from life while you can. Gaby Hinsliff

So haunting and brave and beautiful. Polly Williams

A dazzling, searingly honest book. Love. Sex. Grief. The Wild West. I couldn't put it down. Esther Freud

An extraordinary memoir... Stroud writes with moving, eloquent honesty. Elizabeth Day, The Pool

Compelling and candid, deftly weaving together past and present... a heart-wrenching story told in haunting, lyrical prose. Tatler

Some events can't be mitigated; they can only be endured with grace and style, something Stroud certainly achieves, to judge from this marvellous book. The Spectator

A startling and raw memoir, which has drawn comparisons to Cheryl Strayed's Wild... Brave, beautiful writing, which can't help but inspire us to find our own "wild others". Red magazine

Arundhati Roy's THE MINISTRY OF UTMOST HAPPINESS Sold in 19 Countries

© Mayank Austen Soofi

© Mayank Austen Soofi

We're delighted to share that translation rights in Arundhati Roy's The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, have been sold in nineteen countries by Lisette Verhagen of Susanna Lea Associates.

Brazil, Companhia das Letras - Denmark, Rosinante - Egypt (Arabic), Al Kotob Khan - Finland, Otava - France, Gallimard - Germany, Fischer Verlag - Greece, Psichogios - Holland, Prometheus - Hungary, Helikon - Iceland, Forlagid - Italy, Guanda - Norway,  Pax -Poland, Zysk - Portugal, ASA - Slovakia,  Slovart - Spain, Anagrama - Sweden, Brombergs -Turkey, Can, - Taiwan, Commonwealth.

Simon Prosser, of Penguin imprint Hamish Hamilton who are publishing in the UK, and Meru Gokhale, of Penguin Random House India, said: "The writing is extraordinary, and so too are the characters - brought to life with such generosity and empathy, in language of the utmost freshness, joyfully reminding us that words are alive too, that they can wake us up and lend us new ways of seeing, feeling, hearing, engaging... What an incredible book it is-on multiple levels; one of the finest we have read in recent times."
 

Julia Shaw's Making Evil sells to three publishers

Deals have now been made to three publishers for Julia Shaw's second book, Making Evil. Canongate will publish in the UK, Doubleday in Canada and Hanser in Germany.

The Memory Illusion was a bestseller in both Germany and Canada, and will be published in over fifteen other countries.

'Come with me on a journey to uncover the science behind your living nightmares. Let me pose the questions that you are too afraid to ask in public, but to which you have always wanted to know the answers.

 

This book seeks to harness your curiosity, and offers an exploration of what evil is, and the lessons we can learn from science to better understand why humans do bad things. Using a combination of science and philosophy, I pick apart questions that will help you to better understand the world, and yourself - giving you a guided tour through the darkest corners of your Google search history. Questions like ‘would I kill baby Hitler’, ‘do I look evil’, and ‘why do I want to murder my spouse’.

 

It explores aspects of human nature that help us to understand why we all sometimes think and do things that are ‘evil’. Ultimately, our reaction to deviance may tell us less about others and more about ourselves.'

 

Making Evil is a fresh and rigorously scientific book that breaks down our fears, and tears into the dark dispositions that lie within each of us.

 

As a criminal psychologist Dr Julia Shaw and author of the highly acclaimed The Memory Illusion, deals with the topic of evil on a daily basis. In Making Evil, she uses the latest scientific research to show us why people behave so badly and how we can prevent evil acts by understanding more profoundly how such acts come about – and what truly makes us evil.

 

Foreign rights are represented by Lisette Verhagen at SLA.